Why Does Marlow Consider Kurtz Last Words A Victory?

  1. What is it about Kurtz’s final statements that makes Marlow consider them a victory?
  2. Marlow informs us that he takes Kurtz’s dying remarks as a ‘judgment on the adventures of his soul on this world,’ and that this interpretation is supported by the evidence.
  3. Whatever the reality Kurtz has glimpsed, Marlow regards it as a’moral victory,’ regardless of how it is perceived.
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  5. What exactly is the significance of Kurtz’s final comments in this context?

Marlow views Kurtz’s final remarks to be a win since he spoke exactly what he wanted to say. Obtaining Access The Natural Environment of the African Continent how the nature of the African terrain has been described in Heart of Darkness (10552 words | 43 pages)

Why does Marlow lie to Kurtz’s fiancee about his last words?

When Marlow chooses to lie to Kurtz’s fiancée about Kurtz’s dying remarks, it is less a reflection of his character and more a reflection of Conrad’s criticism on the link between the colonial frontier and the ″home front.″

What are Kurtz’s last words in heart of Darkness?

It is a critical incident in Heart of Darkness where Marlow chooses to lie to Kurtz’s fiancée about his now notorious dying words (‘The horror! The horror!’) as a result of his previous actions. In order to fully comprehend the significance of the events that transpired behind the scenes, we must first examine the significance of what Kurtz planned.

What is Kurtz’s tragic flaw?

  1. According to Marlow, Kurtz’s catastrophic defect is that he became so enmeshed in African society that he lost sight of European principles as a result of his immersion.
  2. The ground was no longer beneath his feet.
  3. ″He had kicked himself free of the earth″ (Conrad, 1898, p.112).
  4. Marlow blames Africa for bringing Kurtz to his knees, rather than directly blaming Kurt for his conduct on the battlefield.

Are Marlow and Kurtz best friends in heart of Darkness?

The travels of Marlow, the story’s protagonist, on the Congo River, where he encounters Kurtz, an agent who works for the Company, supplying them with ivory supplies, are the subject of Joseph Conrad’s Heart of Darkness. Despite the fact that Marlow and Kurtz are not ″best friends,″ they do have a lot in common. The novella focuses on the development of their romance.

Why does Marlow consider Kurtz last words?

Moreover, these closing remarks might be seen to represent the horrors of Belgian (and European) colonialism in general. The outburst, on the other hand, is interpreted by Marlow as Kurtz’s response to the approaching death of his friend.

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What is Kurtz passing Judgement upon when he voices his famous last words the horror the horror what is so horrible?

″Oh, the horror!″ These phrases are effective on more than one level. It is a judgment on Kurtz’s own life and acts as much as it is a judgment on humanity as a whole and its greediness, which manifested itself in the shape of imperialism.

What does Kurtz last words mean?

After spending time in Africa, Kurtz develops a corrupt nature and writes the words ″Exterminate all the brutes!″ on a piece of paper. The savagery he and his comrades perpetrated in Africa, in the name of development and civilisation, is referenced in this passage.

What does Marlow think of Kurtz at the end?

And then, towards the conclusion, Marlow seemed to have returned to his former admiration. After Kurtz passes away while gasping the words ‘The horror!’ out loud, the scene is cut to black. ‘What a terror!’ (3) Marlow comes to the conclusion that these are words of self-realization, and that maybe Kurtz has finally come to terms with his heinous crimes and the depravity of human nature.

What does Marlow respect about Kurtz?

As long as Marlow is committed to Kurtz, he believes that Kurtz, whose final words were ‘the horror,’ understands the reality of what European colonialism in Africa is genuinely like. He finds Kurtz’remarkable,’ and he can’t seem to shake his respect for him, despite the fact that Kurtz was far from faultless in real life.

How does Marlow describe his belief in Kurtz?

Mr. Marlow feels that Kurtz is a decent individual who is not bad in any way. How does Marlow depict the experience of going up the river using metaphors that are prevalent?

How is Kurtz described in Heart of Darkness?

As we discover throughout the novel, Kurtz is a man of many talents—we learn, for example, that he is a great pianist and a fine painter—the most notable of which are his charm and his ability to inspire others. A guy who knows the power of words, Kurtz’s works are distinguished by an eloquence that obscures the horror of their content.

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Why is Kurtz so important in Heart of Darkness?

Throughout the novel, Kurtz, one of the two main characters (the other being Marlow, the narrator of the soty), represents a variety of symbolism. He represents several things, the first of which is the selfishness and commercial attitude of white people in western countries. Second, he represents the white man’s lust for power and authority.

What type of character is Kurtz in Heart of Darkness?

  1. Heart of Darkness is a novel about a young woman who finds herself in the middle of a dark night.
  2. Known as ″Kurtz,″ one of the most mysterious characters in twentieth-century literature, Kurtz has been described as ″a small-town dictator,″ ″a dying god,″ ″an epitome of Europe,″ and ″an attack on European principles.″ It is the combination of these opposing traits that makes Kurtz so attractive to Marlow — and so dangerous to the Company.

What does Kurtz write at the end of his report?

″Exterminate all the brutes!″ says Kurtz at the conclusion of his ″Report″ on the indigenous people. ″May God assist us!″

What is the horror what is the significance of these being Kurtz’s final words his conclusion or judgment?

It was then that he said, ″The horror! The horror!″ These lines represent Mr. Kurtz’s wicked nature, as well as his dread at the prospect of what would happen to him after death if he goes to hell.

Why does Marlow go to Kurtz?

The Manager and his uncle were having a conversation about Kurtz one evening, and Marlow eavesdropped on it. Marlow learnt that Kurtz had requested permission from the Company’s Administration to send him into the jungle in order to demonstrate his ability to obtain ivory, and that he had returned his assistant to the Company’s Manager because he felt he was unqualified for the job.

How are Kurtz and Marlow similar?

In Heart of Darkness, there are numerous parallels between Marlow and Kurtz. The resemblance in their trips is maybe the most obvious and direct comparison between them. Both guys continue their adventure deeper and deeper into the African forest. Kurtz, on the other hand, is driven to madness.

How did Marlow meet his end?

Marlowe was killed in a drunken pub brawl while he was only 29 years old. His death has been attributed to an accident or to a deliberate killing carried out to protect a high-ranking member of the Elizabethan administration, according to historians. Some have even suggested that the murder was staged in order for Marlowe to escape his political opponents.

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What does Marlow realize when Kurtz dies?

Unlike Kurtz, however, Marlow discovers that he also has ″nothing″ to say, and as a result, Kurtz’s existence and his last words bounce between total emptiness and an overflow of significance. The ″horror″ might be either nothing or everything, but it is never simply ″something.″ The exact moment of Kurtz’s death is only hinted at, and only in passing.

Why does Marlow lie to Kurtz’s fiancee about his last words?

When Marlow chooses to lie to Kurtz’s fiancée about Kurtz’s dying remarks, it is less a reflection of his character and more a reflection of Conrad’s criticism on the link between the colonial frontier and the ″home front.″

What are Kurtz’s last words in heart of Darkness?

It is a critical incident in Heart of Darkness where Marlow chooses to lie to Kurtz’s fiancée about his now notorious dying words (‘The horror! The horror!’) as a result of his previous actions. In order to fully comprehend the significance of the events that transpired behind the scenes, we must first examine the significance of what Kurtz planned.

What is Kurtz’s tragic flaw?

  1. According to Marlow, Kurtz’s catastrophic defect is that he became so enmeshed in African society that he lost sight of European principles as a result of his immersion.
  2. The ground was no longer beneath his feet.
  3. ″He had kicked himself free of the earth″ (Conrad, 1898, p.112).
  4. Marlow blames Africa for bringing Kurtz to his knees, rather than directly blaming Kurt for his conduct on the battlefield.

Why does Marlow compare Kurtz to his hero in the Dark Continent?

  1. He argues that the Dark Continent has driven Kurtz insane because he is unable to fully adjust to a world outside of modern society due of his inability to adapt entirely to a world outside of modern civilisation.
  2. Because of Marlow’s strong sentiments of attachment to Kurtz, it is inevitable that he will perceive parallels between himself and his ″idol,″ or at the very least that he will reflect his life in the same manner as Kurtz.

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